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    12
    Mar '17
    Raja Ampat islands annas chromodoris nudibranch

    Anna’s Chromodoris Nudi pair © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands batangas halgerda nudibranch

    Batangas Halgerda Nudi © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands berrys bobtail squid

    Berry’s Bobtail Squid © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands blue dragon aeolid nudibranch

    Blue Dragon Aeolid Nudibranch © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands green coral

    Coral © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands crinoid and sea fan

    Crinoid and sea fan © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands desirable flabellina nudibranch

    Desirable Flabellina Nudi © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands double-spined sea urchin

    Double-spined Sea Urchin © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands false clownfish in anemone

    False Clownfish in Magnificent Anemone © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands giant moray

    Giant Moray © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands jawfish

    Jawfish © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands micro goby on sponge

    Micro-goby on purple sponge © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands orangutan crab

    Orangutan Crab © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands peacock mantis shrimp

    Peacock Mantis Shrimp © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands peppermint sea star

    Peppermint Sea Star © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands pink acropora coral

    Pink Acropora coral polyps © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands coral with anemone shrimp

    Polyp with Anemone Shrimp inside © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands regal angelfish

    Regal Angelfish © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands soft coral

    Soft coral © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands solar powered nudibranch

    Solar-powered Nudibranch © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands spendid dottyback

    Spendid Dottyback © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands variable thorny oyster

    Variable Thorny Oyster © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands whip coral and micro goby

    Whip coral micro-goby © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Raja Ampat islands yamasui cuthona nudibranch

    Yamasu’s Cuthona Nudibranch © Giovanna Fasanelli

    Protecting Raja Ampat Islands for Future Generations

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    in Asia & Pacific and Of Interest

    Diving and Snorkeling the Raja Ampat Islands

    Having just returned from two exceptional diving and snorkeling expeditions to Indonesia’s Raja Ampat Islands, or “Four Kings”, we are reminded once again just how precious these waters and coral reefs truly are. Raja Ampat’s spectacular biodiversity and pristine landscapes have established the area as one of the most sought-after dive destinations in the world—1,500 reef fishes and three quarters of the world’s soft and hard corals call these coral reefs home. As we explored Raja Ampat, our journey took us from Waigeo in the north, the largest of the “Four Kings,” to the soft coral-rich lagoons and walls of Misool, the southernmost group in the Raja Ampat Islands. The photo gallery above showcases a few of the amazing species we encountered, yet it’s just a fraction of the abundance we witnessed while diving and snorkeling in Raja Ampat.

    Supporting Misool Foundation in Raja Ampat

    Apex Expeditions is proud to have made a contribution to Misool Baseftin (Misool Foundation), the non-profit charity arm of Misool Eco Resort, to support their ongoing marine conservation work. The foundation’s mission is to safeguard the future of the most biodiverse marine environment on earth by empowering local communities to reclaim their traditional ownership of the coral reefs. In fact, in the local tribal language, Misool Baseftin means “Misool: We own it together”.

    Together with the local community, Misool has established a 468-square mile Marine Conservation Area which prohibits the capture or removal of any wildlife—shark finning, all types of fishing, and the hunting of turtles or collection of turtle eggs are prohibited. They have also recruited a locally-staffed marine ranger unit to patrol and protect these waters which lie just outside the traditional fishing grounds of the local villages.

    See our Raja Ampat Photography and Field Journal for more images from this incredible region. To learn more about Misool Foundation, or to make a US or Canadian tax-deductible donation through their partner WildAid (specify the program: Indonesia – Misool / Daram), please visit their website at www.misoolfoundation.org.

    We couldn’t be more proud of our commitment to the marine conservation work being carried out by Misool Foundation to ensure that the waters and marine life of Raja Ampat are protected for future generations.

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